University Heights residents say SDUSD expansion plans affecting buildings

first_imgUniversity Heights residents say SDUSD expansion plans affecting buildings March 1, 2018 John Soderman, Updated: 10:17 PM University Heights residents concerned SDUSD’s plan to sell land will lead to condos surrounding historical buildings. pic.twitter.com/2hQeSX9mI6— John Soderman KUSI (@SodermanKUSI) March 2, 2018In December of 2017, SDUSD issued a “Request for Proposals” to exchange three of its properties, including the Ed Center site at 4100 Normal Street, for one property to become the new District Central Office.The Ed Center site is approximately 11 acres and includes the historic Teachers Training Annex and two other historic buildings but does not include Birney Elementary School or the Joint Use Field.According to SDUSD, the Ed Center site is of regional importance as the site of the former San Diego State Normal School, built in 1898 and the predecessor to San Diego State University.The site is also the birthplace of University Heights and contains the Teachers Training Annex, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and several other historic structures. Posted: March 1, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter John Soderman 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsUNIVERSITY HEIGHTS (KUSI) — University Heights residents gathered Thursday night to voice their concerns about a plan that could diminish the historical significance of the iconic University Heights community.Residents are concerned that a proposal to expand several of the San Diego Unified School District’s properties could negatively impact several historic buildings that make University Heights unique.last_img read more

Time Out Crafts Bespoke Multiplatform Sponsorship Campaign Behind Annual Bar Awards

first_imgHarnessing the full range of its platforms and channels, Time Out built an intricate campaign for its Bar Awards sponsor, spanning seven cities.The third annual Bar Awards, presented through a paid partnership with William Grant & Sons, makers of Hendrick’s Gin and Glenfiddich Whisky, provides the distillers with a multi-channel, 10-week-long, B2B campaign, in order to produce the seven-city-spanning awards across the company’s many platforms and through live events for bar professionals and the brand’s audience.The North American Bar Awards, taking place in New York City, Miami, Philadelphia, Chicago, Austin, Los Angeles and San Fransisco, were launched to “help position the brand as an authority and key partner in each city’s bar scene amongst owners, local experts, bartenders,” according to Christine Petersen, CEO of Time Out Digital. According to Petersen, its partners wanted to take advantage of the sponsorship opportunity again after the successes it saw with the Bar Awards last year. Both Time Out and William Grant & Sons looked at factors like making industry connections, attendance of live events—including gaging the energy and camaraderie of attendees—media coverage, and social media coverage, to measure their successes compared to the previous year’s engagement. Time Out confirmed that all of their goals in these categories were met or exceeded last year and have been hit or exceeded so far this year.  The campaign is rooted in digital, video, social, CRM, print and live events in each city, and relies on the sponsor’s active involvement in each of these areas, though the planning and prep of the campaign is turn-key for the distillers and is the collective responsibility for Time Out’s various teams.Petersen says that the planning process began six weeks before the first event and focused on integrating digital platforms—areas where the Time Out audience is notably engaged—including on social media and in video.“William Grant & Sons will be receiving five pieces of custom video content, produced in-house by the Time Out Creative Solutions team,” says Petersen. The content ranges from celebrating the winning Bars of the Year to featuring different bartenders who answer questions about their profession or their bars’ signature cocktails, all highlighting the spirits from the sponsor’s distillery.Outside of digital promotion, the key element of the campaign is the live events which tie in the sponsor by connecting them with the local bar communities and professionals across the various cities. “William Grant & Sons looks to put their brand in hand via event product sampling, showcasing their premium liquor portfolio to new potential clients, and rewarding their top accounts for their business,” says Petersen.William Grant & Sons’s campaign involved the company’s direct participation in each of the cities’ live events as well, including the exclusive use of the distiller’s liquor at each of the events and sponsoring two of the awards, Bar of the Year and Best Legacy Bar, at each event.Charlotte Voisey, William Grant & Sons’s director of brand advocacy, is working alongside the portfolio’s team of Ambassadors to curate signature cocktails for each city, and Petersen says that they “also joined the judging panels together with the Time Out editorial team and other bar industry experts.”One difference at each live event is that William Grant & Sons selects a “hero brand”—a specially curated liquor for the city based off of customer insights and local preferences—which Petersen says allows for the brand’s whole portfolio of drinks to get in the spotlight throughout the campaign. The campaign is also leveraging customer relationship management through the use of email newsletters post-events in each city. “William Grant & Sons is being included as a partner in these emails and it is a great way to inform the experience-hungry, Time Out audience to get out and enjoy the best the bar world has to offer right now,” she says.Since this is the second year with William Grant & Sons’s involvement, Petersen says there were a few event calibrations that were made for this year’s Bar Awards, including scaling back on the amount of food provided at the events. “We were able to scale back to light bites and reallocate the budget to other elements that made more of an impact to our guests and the campaign, such as more prestigious awards. Rather than framed certificates, the winners now receive a tangible crystal award that can be displayed on the bar or on-site more prominently,” she says. The awards also feature Time Out’s and William Grant & Sons’s branding.In order to achieve a fluid campaign across the seven cities, the various departments in the Time Out organization that are involved in building the campaign had to overcome the challenges of being spread out across several time zones, while also ensuring that the sponsor and everyone across the Bar Awards are aware of timelines and the different elements.“We have one dedicated project manager from each core pillar that is responsible for all Bar Awards deliverables in their area of business,” says Petersen. “They ensure that all internal and external deliverables are met and that the clients are happy with the end result.”So far, the campaign and the Bar Awards has been successful for both parties, and Petersen says that the live awards that have already occured have had excellent turnout from professionals and consumers. “We have been able to bolster invaluable connections with industry leaders across the country, while also achieving both the quantitative and qualitative goals of this campaign.”As the sponsors, William Grant & Sons’s director of brand advocacy Charlotte Voisey, says the distillers are excited by “the results coming together across all facets of the partnership, from the media coverage and social sharing to the energy and camaraderie generated through the live events.”last_img read more

One killed during clash over Facebook post in Rangpur

first_imgAn old woman crying as her house torched at Harkali Thakurpara in Rangpur on Friday. Photo: Moinul IslamA man was killed and 20 others including four policemen injured in a clash between law enforcers and locals at Thakurbari village in Sadar upazila of Rangpur on Friday over a youth’s Facebook post ‘demeaning’ Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (PUBH), reports UNB.Additional superintendent of police (Circle A) Saifur Rahman said Titu Chandra, a resident of Thakurbari village, has posted a picture in his Facebook account with derogatory remarks about Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (PUBH).Over the issue, several hundred people gathered at Pagla Pirer Bazar, adjacent to Thakurbari village, after Juma prayers and started chanting slogans demanding immediate arrest of Titu Chandra, he said.Later, around 8,000 people from nearby villages thronged the bazaar and marched towards Thakurbari village, a Hindu-dominated village.Reaching the village, the angry people vandalised and torched 8-10 houses of the Hindu community, the additional SP said.On information, police rushed in, charged baton, fired rubber bullets and lobbed teargas canisters to disperse the agitating people, leaving six people injured with bullets.One of the injured — Hasan — died while being moved to Rangpur Medical College Hospital, Saifur said.Later, the angry mob blocked Rangpur-Syedpur road and vandalised several moving vehicles.Saifur said additional police personnel were called in to bring the situation under control.last_img read more

Beggarfree Dhaka still a utopia

first_imgIn this photo taken recently, 70-year old Abu Bakkar is seen begging on the footpath near Pan Pacific Sonargaon Hotel. Photo: Imam HossainA Dhaka city free from ‘nuisance’ of beggars is not a myth! Visibly invisible, the concept lives in political rhetoric and sometimes on paper, in a country where one-fourth of the population is statistically called poor.Only on 9 May, state minister for social welfare Nuruzzaman Ahmed told parliament that three zones of Dhaka city were made free of beggars.The zones are: Zone-I: Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport and Radisson Blu Water Garden Hotel, zone-II: diplomatic zone, and zone III: Pan Pacific Sonargaon Hotel, InterContinental Dhaka and Bailey Road.Beggars, however, are often seen everywhere in these three zones. In most places, the beggars do not even know that begging is banned there.Abu Bakkar from Pabna begs for money in front of Pan Pacific Sonargaon Hotel. He came to Dhaka around two months ago targeting Shab-e-Barat and the fasting month of Ramadan.The 70-year-old man, who earns around Tk 500 to 700 every day in this capital, does not know that he cannot beg money in the three zones.“No one told me about that,” Abu Bakkar said with a puzzled look. “I roam around begging from Panthapath to Shahbagh. No policemen or security guards disturb me while begging,” he added.According to the social welfare ministry’s data, there are around 100,000 beggars in Dhaka city.In this photo taken on 18 May, disabled Mostafa is seen begging on Gulshan Lake Bridge near Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Gulshan diplomatic zone. Photo: Fajlay Rabbi RaazA member of Bangladesh Ansar, Shamim Sardar, has been working as a security officer for InterContinental Dhaka hotel for the past five months.“We work here in front of the hotel round the clock. Beggars can easily be seen here and in front of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and BIRDEM.’’Asked if he knew that the area has been declared beggar-free, Shamim shook his head in the negative.“I don’t know about this, nor even have I seen any police driving beggars away from in front of the hotel,” he said.Seen in front of SAARC Fountain signal, Zarina Begum was sitting on the pavement with her two-year old daughter, Andhari. Asked if she knows that the footpath where she is begging has been declared beggar-free, she replied she is not a beggar, rather she is a street vendor and sells cigarettes on foot.“I’m not a beggar. I have sold all my cigarette packs today and now I’m just sitting idly beside the road. But, I don’t mind if anyone helps me financially,’’ she said.Just a few yards away, a limping Tofazzal Hossain was leaning on a crutch and begging. Tofazzal, who lost one of his legs in a train accident, is from Rangpur but now lives in an Azimpur slum.His three sons are rickshaw pullers and auto-rickshaw drivers. He also has two daughters.“After much difficulty, I could marry off my daughters. My sons are not well established enough to support us. And this is why I have been begging.’’In this photo taken recently, Zarina Begum and her daughter Andhari are seen sitting on the footpath near Pan Pacific Sonargaon Hotel. Photo: Imam HossainWhen asked if he knows this area has been declared beggar-free, “I know begging for money is legal in Dhaka city. There is no bar. No one has told me anything about this.”Begging, however, is a punishable offence according to existing laws of the country. The minimum punishment for begging is three years in prison and the maximum is seven years, to be doubled for a repetition.Mahfuz (pseudonym), a police constable, attached with Bangladesh Police Lines, deployed in front of Sonargaon hotel, told Prothom Alo, “I don’t know if this place has been declared beggar-free. We often see beggars signalling cars for money. We have not been instructed to look after this. Our duty is to keep the footpath moving so that no one can stand still in front of the hotel.”Only a few metres away, a beggar couple started knocking on the car windows, especially to the expensive cars.One of them is blind.When approached with the same question, they gave Prothom Alo the same reply, “We don’t know that we can’t beg here.”A pedestrian, Hassan Zakaria, said that there was a billboard reading, ‘beggar-free area’ on the island just in front of the Sonargaon hotel. “But, it has been removed a few months ago,” he added.A lame man was found begging for money on the Gulshan Lake Bridge near Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Dhaka on Friday. His name is Mostafa.When approached, Mostafa said he is begging for money with the fear of being evicted as policemen often drive them away from the diplomatic zones in the capital. Despite the fact, he was begging there as both locals and foreigners have a tendency to donate money here.“I know this place has been declared beggar-free as police evicted me twice. Despite that, I sit here to beg as I can earn more here,’’A housewife who lives in Gulshan-2 told Prothom Alo, “Beggars here in posh areas are very smart. Sometimes, they ask for money, especially dollars, from foreigners in English. And sometimes, they will come to your car window and say that they left begging and have become street vendors. And so, you must help them financially. Isn’t this begging too?” In spite of beggars’ presence in all three ‘beggar-free zones’, ruling party leaders and ministers talk tall of having beggar-free Dhaka, and sometimes beggar-free Bangladesh. In this photo taken recently, limping Tofazzal Hossain is seen begging on the footpath near Pan Pacific Sonargaon Hotel. Photo: Imam HossainState minister Nuruzzaman Ahmed said that the country would have no beggars by 2018 as the prime minister announced that beggars would be rehabilitated and job opportunities would be created for them.On 17 March, prime minister Sheikh Hasina mentioned that necessary measures had been taken to make every district free from beggars.Just a few days later on 29 March, finance minister AMA Muhith told a programme, “Begging will completely be rooted out once the Sheikh Hasina-led government comes back to power.”Earlier in mid 2013, the government said it had decided to clear beggars from some locations in the capital including Shahjalal International Airport area, Bailey Road, the diplomatic zone and places surrounding the embassies, and the Sonargaon, Ruposhi Bangla and Radisson hotels.The government took a number of projects to rehabilitate the beggars but these do not seem to have been so successful.According to social welfare ministry officials, the government’s experience of rehabilitating beggars is not pleasant as the beggars simply return to begging just a few months after being rehabilitated.And so, the vision of a beggar-free Dhaka remains a distant dream.last_img read more