Apples FaceTime bug comes at an awkward time The 359 Ep 511

first_img Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Subscribe: iTunes | RSS | Google Play | FeedBurner | SoundCloud |TuneIn | Stitcher reading • Apple’s FaceTime bug comes at an awkward time (The 3:59, Ep. 511) Huawei Apple Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Apple’s FaceTime bug comes at an awkward time (The 3:59,… See All 1 Tags The Daily Charge Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors • Now playing: Watch this: Apple Share your voice Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? 4:36 Comment Your browser does not support the audio element. Security On this podcast, we talk about: Apple’s major FaceTime flaw. A preview of Apple’s earnings.Huawei’s legal troubles.The 3:59 gives you bite-size news and analysis about the top stories of the day, brought to you by the CNET News team in New York and producer Bryan VanGelder. Check out the extended shows on YouTube. Also, don’t forget to rate and review the podcast on iTunes. Apple’s FaceTime bug comes at an awkward time (The 3:59, Ep. 511)last_img read more

SBI Maruti Suzuki Tata Motors hit new 52week high as Sensex Nifty

first_imgShares of frontline entities such as State Bank of India (SBI), Maruti Suzuki, Tata Motors, Hero Motocorp, Axis Bank and HDFC zoomed to new 52-week-highs on Wednesday, catapulting equity benchmarks to new highs in the process. The BSE Sensex hit a new year-high of 29,067 before shedding gains to trade at 28,988, up 10 points, at around 12.39 p.m.The 50-scrip NSE Nifty was trading with minor losses of around five points at 8,937 after reaching an intraday high of 8,951.The rally on the 30-scrip BSE Sensex was led by a diversified set of stocks that rose to new year highs. SBI hit Rs. 268.15, Maruti Suzuki Rs. 53,57.95, Tata Motors Rs. 598.60, Axis Bank Rs. 638, GAIL (India) Rs. 407.80 and HDFC Rs. 1,463.25. Tata Motors announced on Tuesday that it won orders to supply 5,000 buses worth Rs.900 crore to 25 state transport units, marking a growth of 80 percent compared to last year. Besides, many other bank stocks such as Kotak Mahindra Bank, Canara Bank, Federal Bank, South Indian Bank, Allahabad Bank and IndusInd Bank also hit new 52-week high. The BSE Bankex was up 0.32 percent on Wednesday, consolidating the 2.96 percent gain the previous day.Earlier, brokerage Angel Broking said in its pre-market note that Indian stock markets were expected to open on a positive note.The rupee opened at a four-month high of 66.36 to the U.S. dollar after closing at 66.52 on Tuesday. “The intra-day range is seen between 66.10-66.50 levels,” IFA Global said in a note on Wednesday.The appreciation is seen as an outcome of sustained buying by foreign institutional investors (FIIs) on the stock and debt markets. On Tuesday, FIIs were net buyers of Indian equities worth Rs. 1,438 crore, according to provisional data released by the National Stock Exchange (NSE).Wipro shares were trading with marginal gains of around 1 percent at Rs. 487.75 after the Bengaluru-based company announced winning a three-year contract from Norway’s railway transport company NSB.The yield on the 6.97% 2026 bond, which is new 10-year debt, was down 4 bps to 6.92 percent on Tuesday while the 7.59% 2026 bond yield dropped 2 bps to 7.10 percent, retail financial services company Geojit BNP Paribas said in a note on Tuesday.last_img read more

27000 Rohingya enter Bangladesh after fresh violence

first_imgThis 30 August, 2017 photo shows Rohingya refugees reaching for food aid at Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhiya near the Bangladesh-Myanmar border. Photo: AFPBangladeshi border guards have recovered two dozen bodies from the country’s shore in the last two days, as tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims make desperate attempts to flee the worst violence involving the Myanmar minority in at least five years.At the United Nations, the US ambassador to the world body, Nikki Haley, urged Myanmar’s security forces to avoid attacking innocent civilians.Haley condemned recent attacks by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army but added “as Burmese security forces act to prevent further violence, they have a responsibility to adhere to international humanitarian law, which includes refraining from attacking innocent civilians and humanitarian workers.” Hindu people who fled violence in their village pass time at a temporary internally displaced persons (IDP) camp in Maungdaw, Myanmar 30 August, 2017. Photo: Reuters She also urged security forces to ensure aid reaches those in need and to ensure the rights of all communities.Around 27,400 Rohingya Muslims have crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar since Friday (25 Aug), three UN sources said, after Rohingya insurgents wielding sticks, knives and crude bombs attacked police posts and an army base in Rakhine state, leading to clashes that killed at least 117 people.Myanmar said its security forces were carrying out clearance operations in northern Rakhine to defend against “extremist terrorists”. Monitors said fleeing Rohingya reported that the army and ethnic Rakhine Buddhist vigilantes have unleashed a+ campaign of arson aimed at driving out the Muslim population. New Rohingya refugees wait to enter the Kutupalang makeshift refugee camp, in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, 30 August, 2017. Photo: Reuters Reuters reporters in Bangladesh on Thursday saw a huge fire on the Myanmar side of the Naf river.Many villages were also on fire near the town of Maungdaw in Rakhine, where another Reuters reporter saw charred debris and smoke billowing from the forest.The UN sources in Bangladesh said around 20,000 Rohingya were stranded in no man’s land between the two countries. One predicted the figure could jump to 30,000 later on Thursday.Yanghee Lee, the UN special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar, said the humanitarian situation was deteriorating rapidly.“Many thousands of people are increasingly at risk of grave violations of their human rights,” she said in a statement. “The worsening cycle of violence … must be broken urgently.”New Rohingya refugees wait to enter the Kutupalang makeshift refugee camp, in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, August 30, 2017. ReutersMyanmar has evacuated thousands of Buddhists from Rakhine since the start of the fighting that has mainly killed Rohingya insurgents but also security force personnel, according to the Myanmar government.The treatment of about 1.1 million Rohingya in Myanmar is the biggest challenge facing Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, accused by Western critics of not speaking out for a minority that has long complained of persecution.On Thursday, the bodies of 11 Rohingya children and nine women washed up on the Bangladesh side of the Naf after their boat overturned, said Ariful Islam, a Bangladesh border guard commander.A body of a Rohingya refugee child who died as the boat capsized while crossing the border through Bay of Bengal at Shah Porir Dwip near Teknaf, Bangladesh, 31 August, 2017. Photo: Reuters The bodies of two Rohingya women and two children were recovered on Wednesday after their boat was fired on by Myanmar’s Border Guard Police, Islam said. A Rohingya leader in Bangladesh cited survivors saying both boats were overcrowded.In the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar, makeshift camps for the displaced set up since similar violence last October were being expanded.One arrival, Mohammed Rashid, 45, wore a surgical dressing under his eye, saying bullet splinters injured him after the Myanmar army opened fire on a group of Rohingya.This August 29, 2017 photo shows Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar resting at Kutupalong refugee camp along the Bangladesh-Myanmar border near the Bangladeshi town of Ukhiya. AFPHe said about 100 people made their way to the border together, and he saw explosions and people dying.“We hid in the forest for two days and then we were stopped at the border, but we got through. We heard that the houses in our village have burned down,” Rashid told Reuters.“BURNING, BURNING”Chris Lewa of the Arakan Project, a Rohingya monitoring group, said it appeared Myanmar security forces were trying to drive out much of the Rohingya population. She said ethnic Rakhine vigilantes were “participating in the burning of villages”.“What we’re hearing is burning, burning, burning,” she said. “And it seems to be spreading from south to north.”Rohingya children cross the Bangladesh-Myanmar border fence as they try to enter Bangladesh in Bandarban, an area under Cox`s Bazar authority. ReutersMyanmar has said it has the right to defend itself from attack, adding that security personnel were told to protect innocent civilians.The Myanmar army has said it is battling insurgents who continued to ambush government forces. Monitors said there have been few, if any, insurgent attacks reported since Friday’s initial offensive.The violence marks a dramatic escalation of a conflict that has simmered since October, when a similar but much smaller series of Rohingya attacks on security posts prompted a brutal military response dogged by allegations of rights abuses.The Rohingya are denied citizenship in Myanmar and regarded as illegal immigrants, despite claiming roots that date back centuries. Bangladesh is also growing increasingly hostile to Rohingya, more than 400,000 of whom live in the poor South Asian country after fleeing Myanmar since the early 1990s.Rohingya people look on at a makeshift shelter in No Man’s Land after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border fence, in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, 29 August. Photo: ReutersBangladesh on Wednesday pushed back 366 Rohingya trying to enter the country though thousands have set up temporary camps along the porous land border, borders guards said.The International Organization for Migration joined UN Secretary-general Antonio Guterres in appealing to Bangladesh to admit people caught on the border. Bangladesh has insisted it lacks resources to care for them.Aid workers say contingency stocks of materials are low and their biggest problem is extreme overcrowding in makeshift settlements.last_img

CPIM MLA joins TMC

first_imgIn a jolt to the CPI(M) ahead of next year’s Assembly polls, CPI(M) MLA from Khandaghosh on Thursday joined the TMC accusing its leadership of failing to reach out to the masses.Nabin Chandra Bag along with other CPI(M) leaders from Bardhaman district joined the TMC in the presence of senior ruling party leaders Partha Chatterjee and Arup Biswas.“He has decided to join the TMC to become part of the developmental work ushered in by our party leader Mamata Banerjee,” Chatterjee said.Bag said he was unhappy with the CPI(M)leadership as the party had completely lost touch with the masses.The CPI(M) leadership is yet to officially react to the development.last_img read more

Supercharging the BandAid Five futuristic bandages that could take wound healing to

first_imgToday’s bandages are pretty good at covering up wounds, sealing them off from infectious bacteria and allowing the body to go to work patching up the damage. But could there come a time when bandages play more of an active role in accelerating healing and fighting infection, so we can peel them off and get on with our lives sooner? A number of research groups around the world have already produced promising experimental versions of futuristic bandages that could take our healing game to the next level. Here’s a look at some of the more interesting examples. How to improve today’s typical wound dressing is a problem researchers are coming at from all kinds of angles. This includes everything from using body heat to hurry things along, to hydrogels that deliver medicine to the site, to bandages that take their cues from the healing properties of scabs. Amid all this exciting progress, there are two mechanisms in particular that are providing promising paths forward. One centers on the notion that electrical currents can be harnessed to speed up healing by killing off bacteria and promoting blood flow to the site. This has long been explored as a way of accelerating wound healing, but one 2015 study started to give the idea real substance. staff reporter, 360Dx, 2018 The other revolves around fluctuating pH levels in fluids at the site of a wound. By sneaking sensors into wound dressings that can monitor these biomarkers, scientists are coming up with inventive ways to not only track the progress being made behind the curtain, but even deliver medication automatically as it is required. Here are five experimental prototypes that you won’t be seeing in the clinic any time soon, but do leverage these technologies to demonstrate what wound dressing could look like further down the track. Electrifying the Band-Aid A wound treated via electrical stimulation (right) versus one left to heal normally (left), after 10 days healing time, as part of a 2015 study at the  University of Manchester  University of Manchester  We recommend A prototype of the bandage developed by researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MITUniversity of Nebraska-Lincoln The prototype smart bandage developed at Tufts UniversityNanoLab – Sameer Sonkusale, Tufts University Back in 2015, scientists at Washington State University published a paper detailing what they described as an electronic Band-Aid. The device consisted of a conductive carbon fabric that could be fed with an electrical current, which generated hydrogen peroxide that served to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The team tested out the tech on pig tissue against the multi-drug resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, where it reduced the population to 1/10,000th of its size within 24 hours. Powered by the human body Blood Assay Can Predict Latent TB That May Become Active in Children, Study Finds Back in 2017, we looked at a smart bandage that also used gels to contain tiny doses of different medicines, with a built in micro-controller sending a voltage through certain fibers to selectively release the drugs inside. These could be triggered automatically by fluctuating pH levels or even glucose, or alternatively, has the capacity to be triggered wirelessly by a smartphone.”This is the first bandage that is capable of dose-dependent drug release,” University of Nebraska-Lincoln assistant professor and team member Ali Tamayol said at the time. If a wound has turned chronic, sensor areas on the Flusitex bandage will glow when exposed to UV lightEmpa/CSEM Grail Raises $900M in Series B Round FDA Releases Discussion Paper on LDT Regulation After Gathering Stakeholder Feedback A University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers fits a smart bandage around the wrist of graduate student Yin LongSam Million-Weaver While the potential of using electricity to promote wound healing has been explored through clunky electrotherapy units and the like, last year scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison published research describing a decidedly more portable option. With a band wrapped around the patient’s torso embedded with nanogenerators to harvest energy from the movement of the ribcage during breathing, the system could provide power to an electric bandage. During experiments, this healed skin-thick wounds in lab rats within three days, compared to the 12 days it took a control group. A bandage that glows when it’s time to go Google Analytics settings Singapore Team Develops Sequencing Method to Calculate Fetal Fraction for Targeted Prenatal Tests Leaning on pH levels for wound monitoring is one thing, but could such an approach be used to deliver medicines as needed? Last year, a team at Tufts University demonstrated how such a thing could be possible through a smart bandage with a built-in sensor to measure pH values of the wound. A built-in microprocessor uses these readings to determine if an infection of inflammation is present, with higher levels again indicating that all is not well. If that’s the case, it heats up antibiotic gels that release drugs in response to the threat. Bringing the smartphone into the mix Privacy policy Before (L) and after (R) images show the population of bacteria (green) was drastically reduced following the application of the an electrified scaffoldWashington State University Danaher Q1 Revenues Rise 7 Percent 360Dx, 2017 Turna Ray, 360Dx, 2017 FDA Issues Warning Letter to Becton Dickinson Over Facility Violations staff reporter, 360Dx, 2017 360Dx, 2017 Powered by I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Monica Heger, 360Dx, 2017 Monitoring the progress of a wound presents something of a dilemma for clinicians, as repeatedly peeling back the dressing for a look invites a greater risk of infection. Back in 2017, scientists in Switzerland demonstrated a bandage that glows when the wound becomes chronic. This is based on the idea that pH levels of the wound’s fluids spike at eight and then settle on five or six if it is healing healthily, while a steady seven or eight indicates a chronic situation. The bandage has custom-made molecules within it that light up only when pH is at 7.5, while anything else means the dressing can be left in place. A drip-feed of on-demand medication Yes Nolast_img read more

Dutch scale back extra security at Amsterdam airport

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> THE HAGUE – Dutch authorities say beefed-up security measures at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport are being scaled back following investigation of an unspecified threat.The country’s National Coordinator of Counterterrorism and Security says in a statement that some of the extra measures, which included military police checking cars approaching the airport to drop off passengers, will end Thursday evening, just under three weeks after they were introduced.The counterterror co-ordination office says “further investigations have led to the conclusion that some of the extra measures are no longer necessary.”The move comes amid busy days at the national airport as the summer vacation period draws to a close.Since March 2013, the threat level in the Netherlands has been at “substantial,” the second highest on a five-step scale. The Canadian Press Share Thursday, August 18, 2016 center_img Posted by Dutch scale back extra security at Amsterdam airport Tags: Amsterdamlast_img read more