San Diego celebrates 250th anniversary at Presidio Park

first_img Posted: July 16, 2019 San Diego celebrates 250th anniversary at Presidio Park KUSI Newsroom, July 16, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The city of San Diego commemorated its 250th anniversary today with a celebration at Presidio Park.The ceremony is part of the city’s yearlong 250th anniversary celebration of the city’s founding as a Spanish settlement, which will culminate in a two-day Founders’ Day Festival in September.Today’s festivities featured cultural performances and the dedication of new historical exhibits in Presidio Park’s Junipero Serra Museum.Local and state officials like San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Assemblyman Todd Gloria were in attendance. KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

Morning brief Emergency in Florida Rahul Gandhi attacks PM Modi ISL results

first_imgHere are some stories from International Business Times India to start your day with:1. Obama declares emergency in Florida as Hurricane Matthew arrives, having pummelled HaitiUS President Barack Obama has declared a state of emergency in the coastal state of Florida as Hurricane Matthew approaches its shores, having wreaked havoc in Haiti, where it has claimed hundreds of lives and caused huge damage to property. Read more…2. Rahul Gandhi says Narendra Modi hiding behind blood of soldiersFollowing the media flaying some members of the Opposition over their comments questioning the surgical strikes, internet and late night television news erupted with the news of Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi on Thursday accusing Prime Minister Narendra Modi of indulging in political exploitation over the sacrifices of soldiers. Read more…3. This is what Pepsi and Coke have to say about study highlighting harmful toxins in PET bottlesLeading soft drink companies, including Pepsi and Coca Cola, have responded to claims that products in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles contain harmful toxins. Read more…4. Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher to have a baby boyMila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher are expecting their second baby any day now and although the couple has been quiet about the sex of baby no. 2, they did finally reveal it. Read more…5. ISL 2016: Marcelinho steals the show as Delhi Dynamos defeat Chennaiyin FCDelhi Dynamos played some wonderful football to pick up three points in their first Indian Super League 2016 match as they defeated defending champions Chennaiyin FC 3-1 at Chennai’s Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium on Thursday. Marcelinho’s brace and Badara Badji’s headed goal proved to be enough as Dudu Omagbemi scored the solitary goal for the home team. Read more…last_img read more

3D Printing as a Replacement for Cooking Its Coming

first_img 3-D printing has made waves in industries from fashion to space to biotech. It’s also poised to radically transform the way we think about and prepare food.Image credit: Modernist Cuisine | Vimeo That was the takeaway from a talk on the future of 3-D printing given Wednesday at the Tribeca Film Festival by 3D Systems’ chief entrepreneur officer Ping Fu, who announced that the company will be launching a consumer chocolate 3-D printer this year.3-D printing technology is already being used by high-end chefs — she shared a video of an elaborate 50 course meal prepared by the Modernist Cuisine’s Nathan Myhrvold that integrated 3-D printed elements — but has yet to go mainstream.Video credit: Modernist Cuisine | VimeoFu predicts that will soon change. “I believe the food printer will be the first one that is going to be adopted in everybody’s home,” she told the audience, painting a picture of a near-future where cooking a meal is redefined as designing it on a computer and then printing it out in the kitchen. “3-D printing will allow delicious nutritious food with great presentation to be delivered locally.”Related: How a 3-D Printer Just Gave This Little Girl an Awesome, New Prosthetic HandIt will also allow individuals to ‘cook’ for friends and family members remotely. When her daughter was growing up, Fu often had to work late at the office. She wanted to somehow still cook her dinner, a futile fantasy. At least, it was back then. “With a 3-D printer, this is totally possible,” she said.We’re still a long ways from 3-D printing entire meals, and Fu understands that for many people, 3-D printing dinner may feel like cheating, replacing a messy, joyful social process with a cold and clinical one.She urged the audience to keep an open mind. Replacing cooking with 3-D printing doesn’t necessarily make the process less social. Just instead of collaborating in the kitchen, families will “co-create” around the computer. Related: This Drivable Car Was 3-D Printed in 44 Hours 2 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global April 23, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Supercharging the BandAid Five futuristic bandages that could take wound healing to

first_imgToday’s bandages are pretty good at covering up wounds, sealing them off from infectious bacteria and allowing the body to go to work patching up the damage. But could there come a time when bandages play more of an active role in accelerating healing and fighting infection, so we can peel them off and get on with our lives sooner? A number of research groups around the world have already produced promising experimental versions of futuristic bandages that could take our healing game to the next level. Here’s a look at some of the more interesting examples. How to improve today’s typical wound dressing is a problem researchers are coming at from all kinds of angles. This includes everything from using body heat to hurry things along, to hydrogels that deliver medicine to the site, to bandages that take their cues from the healing properties of scabs. Amid all this exciting progress, there are two mechanisms in particular that are providing promising paths forward. One centers on the notion that electrical currents can be harnessed to speed up healing by killing off bacteria and promoting blood flow to the site. This has long been explored as a way of accelerating wound healing, but one 2015 study started to give the idea real substance. staff reporter, 360Dx, 2018 The other revolves around fluctuating pH levels in fluids at the site of a wound. By sneaking sensors into wound dressings that can monitor these biomarkers, scientists are coming up with inventive ways to not only track the progress being made behind the curtain, but even deliver medication automatically as it is required. Here are five experimental prototypes that you won’t be seeing in the clinic any time soon, but do leverage these technologies to demonstrate what wound dressing could look like further down the track. Electrifying the Band-Aid A wound treated via electrical stimulation (right) versus one left to heal normally (left), after 10 days healing time, as part of a 2015 study at the  University of Manchester  University of Manchester  We recommend A prototype of the bandage developed by researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MITUniversity of Nebraska-Lincoln The prototype smart bandage developed at Tufts UniversityNanoLab – Sameer Sonkusale, Tufts University Back in 2015, scientists at Washington State University published a paper detailing what they described as an electronic Band-Aid. The device consisted of a conductive carbon fabric that could be fed with an electrical current, which generated hydrogen peroxide that served to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The team tested out the tech on pig tissue against the multi-drug resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, where it reduced the population to 1/10,000th of its size within 24 hours. Powered by the human body Blood Assay Can Predict Latent TB That May Become Active in Children, Study Finds Back in 2017, we looked at a smart bandage that also used gels to contain tiny doses of different medicines, with a built in micro-controller sending a voltage through certain fibers to selectively release the drugs inside. These could be triggered automatically by fluctuating pH levels or even glucose, or alternatively, has the capacity to be triggered wirelessly by a smartphone.”This is the first bandage that is capable of dose-dependent drug release,” University of Nebraska-Lincoln assistant professor and team member Ali Tamayol said at the time. If a wound has turned chronic, sensor areas on the Flusitex bandage will glow when exposed to UV lightEmpa/CSEM Grail Raises $900M in Series B Round FDA Releases Discussion Paper on LDT Regulation After Gathering Stakeholder Feedback A University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers fits a smart bandage around the wrist of graduate student Yin LongSam Million-Weaver While the potential of using electricity to promote wound healing has been explored through clunky electrotherapy units and the like, last year scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison published research describing a decidedly more portable option. With a band wrapped around the patient’s torso embedded with nanogenerators to harvest energy from the movement of the ribcage during breathing, the system could provide power to an electric bandage. During experiments, this healed skin-thick wounds in lab rats within three days, compared to the 12 days it took a control group. A bandage that glows when it’s time to go Google Analytics settings Singapore Team Develops Sequencing Method to Calculate Fetal Fraction for Targeted Prenatal Tests Leaning on pH levels for wound monitoring is one thing, but could such an approach be used to deliver medicines as needed? Last year, a team at Tufts University demonstrated how such a thing could be possible through a smart bandage with a built-in sensor to measure pH values of the wound. A built-in microprocessor uses these readings to determine if an infection of inflammation is present, with higher levels again indicating that all is not well. If that’s the case, it heats up antibiotic gels that release drugs in response to the threat. Bringing the smartphone into the mix Privacy policy Before (L) and after (R) images show the population of bacteria (green) was drastically reduced following the application of the an electrified scaffoldWashington State University Danaher Q1 Revenues Rise 7 Percent 360Dx, 2017 Turna Ray, 360Dx, 2017 FDA Issues Warning Letter to Becton Dickinson Over Facility Violations staff reporter, 360Dx, 2017 360Dx, 2017 Powered by I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Monica Heger, 360Dx, 2017 Monitoring the progress of a wound presents something of a dilemma for clinicians, as repeatedly peeling back the dressing for a look invites a greater risk of infection. Back in 2017, scientists in Switzerland demonstrated a bandage that glows when the wound becomes chronic. This is based on the idea that pH levels of the wound’s fluids spike at eight and then settle on five or six if it is healing healthily, while a steady seven or eight indicates a chronic situation. The bandage has custom-made molecules within it that light up only when pH is at 7.5, while anything else means the dressing can be left in place. A drip-feed of on-demand medication Yes Nolast_img read more