Forbes Plans to Launch Series of Community Apps

first_img Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed, nor was a specific timeline for launching the apps, though Lewis D’Vorkin, chief product officer for Forbes, says they’re well into the development process already. He expects the company will have multiple new apps in the market by the end of this year. Specifically, Forbes will look to leverage the private sharing, notification and profile aspects of Camerama’s tech, as opposed to its photo capabilities. The company’s founder, Salah Akram Zalatimo, will also join Forbes as vice president of mobile products. D’Vorkin says it’s yet to be determined if the products will be free or paid, but monetization will stay close to the models Forbes uses already. While the publisher already has a handful of apps to its name—they range from standard magazine access points to more personalized utilities on topics like financial planning—they’re all essentially distribution mechanisms for Forbes editorial content. The new apps will have Forbes content on them, D’Vorkin says, but that won’t be the focus. “We’re moving forward on creating a series of apps that are much more about niche communities, very social network-esque, and aren’t just a distribution platform for [Forbes] content,” D’Vorkin says. “The bulk [of the content] will come from communities sharing, posting, working with each other within the app.”center_img “These apps will be about streams and streaming content, so our [native advertising platform] Brandvoice and our sponsorships will be the most suitable for this,” he says. “These apps are a wonderful way for us to appeal to smaller, niche audiences. It’s an area of the marketplace that advertisers want to reach. They want the right group of people in a very curated environment. So we’ll be able to accomplish two of our goals with our targeted apps and the scale of the website.” Forbes Media bought photo-sharing app, Camerama, Monday as part of a larger effort to establish several niche app environments for its community. App development is the latest tech venture Forbes has taken in recent years. The company has invested heavily in its own site and, notably, its contributor network CMS, Forbes Falcon, which was licensed to B2B publisher ALM in 2013.last_img read more

Iran fires missiles into Syria over parade attack

first_imgMap Syria. Photo: CollectedIran’s Revolutionary Guards said Monday they had launched a missile attack against a “terrorist” headquarters in Syria in retaliation for a September attack on the Iranian city of Ahvaz.“The headquarters of those responsible for the terrorist crime in Ahvaz was attacked a few minutes ago east of the Euphrates by several ballistic missiles fired by the aerospace branch of the Guardians of the Revolution,” the Guards said on their official website.“Based on preliminary reports, many takfiri terrorists and the leaders responsible for the terrorist crime in Ahvaz have been killed or wounded in this missile attack,” the Guards added.The term “takfiri”, derived from the Arabic word for anathema, is used by the Iranian authorities to refer to Sunni jihadists.The Guards did not say where the missiles were launched from.According to Iran’s Fars news agency, the Guards fired Zolfaghar and Qiam missiles, with a range of 750 kilometres and 800 kilometres (465 and 500 miles), respectively.On 22 September, 24 people were shot dead in an attack at a military parade in Ahvaz in southwest Iran. The Islamic State group, which Iran and its Damascus allies are fighting in Syria, has claimed responsibility for the attack.Iranian president Hassan Rouhani had vowed a “crushing” response in retaliation.last_img read more

Metro Tries Out New Safety Technology On The Light Rail Lines

first_imgListen 00:00 /01:11 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share X – / 4Earlier this year, two people were hit and killed by trains just a few days apart. But the close calls are harder to measure. The transit agency has released several videos showing people walking or riding directly into the path of a train.To try to cut down on those incidents Metro is rolling out a new warning system, developed in conjunction with the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. As for how it works, a bluetooth signal from the train sets off an audible warning at the rail stop. Metro CEO Tom Lambert says they’re trying it out at two locations, Main Street Square and Hermann Park.“We expect to learn more lessons from this as we look to apply it at additional locations along the corridor,” adds Lambert.And they may expand the technology in the future according to Metro board member Jim Robinson.“Are there applications of this that can be put on people’s cellphones?” asks Robinson. “If they had the application on the cellphone and they were a motorist it would warn them the train was nearby.”Along with the new warning system, Metro says it’s also working on possible design changes at the Hermann Park and Med Center rail stops. last_img read more