Bill And Melinda Gates Foundation To Match RED Donations To Global Fund

first_imgAt the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland last week, (RED) – the AIDS organization founded by Bono and Bobby Shriver – marked ten years since its 2006 inception at the same location.Founded to create a sustainable flow of private sector money for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and heat around the AIDS issue, (RED)‘s partners, special events and many extraordinary collaborators have generated $350 million for the AIDS fight since 2006. To mark the anniversary and doubling (RED)’s impact, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced that it will match every dollar generated by (RED) for the Global Fund in 2016, up to $50 million.With UNAIDS data showing that mother-to-child transmission of HIV could be effectively ended as early as 2020, América Móvil, Apple, Bank of America, Belvedere, GAP, SAP, Starbucks and The Coca-Cola Company have renewed their partnerships with (RED) in support of reaching this goal, with NetJets, Salesforce and Tradeshift also announcing new partnerships with (RED) to fight AIDS.As the world reaches a critical point in the fight, the impact of (RED) partner money has never been clearer. The $350 million raised by (RED) has impacted the lives of 60 million people with prevention, treatment, counseling, HIV testing and care services. Life-saving ARV medication now costs as little as 30 cents a day in sub-Saharan Africa; it not only saves the lives of mothers living with HIV, but also prevents transmission of the virus to their unborn babies. By getting the medicine to those who need it most, an AIDS-Free Generation can become a reality in as few as five years.“The $350 million (RED) has raised is important — particularly to the people who are alive because of it — but (RED) isn’t just about cold cash, it’s about political heat,” said Bono, cofounder of (RED). “When Bobby Shriver and I started (RED), people said we were mad. We were mad, we were outraged that where you lived would decide whether you lived – and that’s exactly what was happening with the AIDS crisis. But this isn’t a last decade fight, it’s the next decade where we really need to show up and see this off. I’m really touched that in this next year what we raise will be matched by the Gates Foundation. Let’s make sure we get to $100 million.”“Over the past decade, (RED) has enrolled millions of people and dozens of brands in the global fight against AIDS,” said Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. “Today’s match will provide the Global Fund with up to $100 million to help save 60,000 lives, prevent 2.3 million new infections and generate more than $2 billion in economic gains for developing countries. That’s an amazing return on investment.”last_img read more

Kyoto prof rolls out omnidirectional wheelchair

first_imgImage: Kyoto University The device is supposed to be especially handy for use in tight spaces; the intention is to help users of electric wheelchairs maneuver their movements with greater freedom than they have in the past. What is not such good news is that the vehicle on display cost $36,300 to produce, The research lead, Masaharu Komori, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Kyoto University, is well aware of the price shortcoming and plans to continue work on the chair to bring costs down, and make the chair lighter and more compact. The eventual target price is $12,000. Komori and team hope to commercialize the Permoveh in three to five years.This Permoveh “rollout” comes at a time when Japan is showing much interest in bringing on improved assistive technology, from robots to motorized chairs, that can help the elderly. Among the innovations reported have been a bed that changes into an electric wheelchair and a robot that can wash hair.Whether or not this omnidirectional vehicle can eventually be a popular wheelchair of choice (the top speed is 3.7 mph) for the elderly remains to be seen, but it is being suggested that the Permoveh wheel technology could be adapted for use in conveyor equipment in factories and warehouses. One site notes the wheel technology is like that seen in Honda’s “U3-X” which also enables the rider to move backwards, forwards, and side to side using an omnidirectional wheel. Honda’s description about how the wheel structure enables movement in all directions is that “multiple small-diameter motor-controlled wheels are connected in-line to form one large-diameter wheel. Rotating the large-diameter wheel moves the U3-X forward and backward, while rotating the small-diameter wheels moves it side-to-side. Combining these movements causes the U3-X to move diagonally.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The driver uses a hand control that can turn the chair in the desired direction. The driver just needs to tip the lever in the direction he or she wants to move. The wheels alone move if the driver wants to go backwards or forwards. The rollers move if the driver wants to go sideways. Both wheels and rollers move if the driver wants to go diagonally. Japan’s Honda unveils futuristic unicyle (w/ Video) Explore furthercenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — A mechanical engineering professor has taken the wraps off his vehicle that is designed to become a next-generation wheelchair. As its formal name suggests, this is the Personal Mobile Vehicle, or Permoveh for short. Rolling it around at his lab in Kyoto, Japan, earlier this month, the professor carried out the demo before an audience of observers and photographers. They watched him ride the device, with its clever wheel-within-wheel system, which allowed the vehicle to move in any direction. The Permoveh has four same-sized wheels with 32 rollers each. They rotate in a perpendicular direction to the rim. The rollers sit inside the main wheels, allowing the vehicle to move in more directions than just back and forth. More information: www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/ja/news_data … s6/2011/120322_1.htm (in Japanese) Citation: Kyoto prof rolls out omnidirectional wheelchair (2012, March 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-kyoto-prof-omnidirectional-wheelchair.html © 2012 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more